1. 22:12 1st Aug 2014

    Notes: 1266

    Reblogged from anonymous-ninja

    bluestockingbookworm:

    shehasreadtoomanybooks:

    Book shops are weird, you stand in front of a wall of books and suddenly you pick up one of hundreds, just from seeing the words on the spine, and say, “Yes. You will come home with me.”

    Weird and magical.

     
  2. 22:12

    Notes: 743

    Reblogged from undisputed-ruler-of-the-world

    itsstuckyinmyhead:

    Avengers photoset #20

     
  3. 22:10

    Notes: 13943

    Reblogged from anonymous-ninja

    heavenly-demon:

    Me right now.

     
  4. 22:09

    Notes: 95766

    Reblogged from boho-books

    image: Download

    falling-slowly-upward:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]



Do NOT under ANY circumstances tell the person having a panic attack that they are just seeking attention. Attention is one of the things that causes panic attacks so I promise that they definitely DON’T want attention.

    falling-slowly-upward:

    perspicious:

    WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
        
    1. Stay with us and keep calm.
      The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

    2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
      You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

    3. Move us to a quiet place.
      We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

    4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
      We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

    5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

    6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

    7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
      As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                     
    WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

    1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
    We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

    Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

    Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


    2. Say, “Calm down.”
    This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

    Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

    Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


    3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
    Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

    Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


    4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
    Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

    The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

    Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


    CREDIT [X]  [X]

    Do NOT under ANY circumstances tell the person having a panic attack that they are just seeking attention. Attention is one of the things that causes panic attacks so I promise that they definitely DON’T want attention.
     
  5. 22:09

    Notes: 173244

    Reblogged from boho-books

    imaginefallout:

    IN CLASS TODAY THIS KID GOT IN TROUBLE FOR READING WHILE THE TEACHER WAS LECTURING SO THE TEACHER TOOK HIS BOOK AND WHEN THE TEACHER TURNED AROUND HE PULLED OUT ANOTHER COPY OF THE SAME FUCKING BOOK

     
  6. 22:08

    Notes: 7435

    Reblogged from anonymous-ninja

    nine favorite shikai (+release commands)

    (Source: karyuus)

     
  7. 22:08

    Notes: 405615

    Reblogged from boho-books

    bird-on-a-leash:

    paperwhale:

    claydols:

    your bra strap is showing please hide it because it is suggestive. also your boobs are producing lumps in your shirt please hide them. your butt is in the same situation please get rid of it. also your legs. your arms. your face.

    image

    I can see your feet and it’s very distracting and slightly arousing.

    (Source: basedgosh)

     
  8. 22:08

    Notes: 162133

    Reblogged from undisputed-ruler-of-the-world

    jennyatsdcc:

    tavidan:

    shameglobe:

    fyeah-hetalia:

    You know what show had the biggest plot twist ever? 

    image

    I had absolutely no clue Blue was a girl

    meaning my entire childhood was spent shipping two female dogs

    I had a lesbian dog otp at the age of 5 omfg

    Magenta is a boy

    what the fuck

    blue’s clues took assigned gender colors and told society to suck it

     
  9. 22:07

    Notes: 247032

    Reblogged from boho-books

    zeklos:

    foreverdepressedteen:

    allhailtheboyking:

    IM GOING TO SCREAM IM IN CLASS AND THESE GIRLS WHO BULLIED ME IN 5TH GRADE ARE WHISPERING AND THEYRE LIKE

    "holy shit did she go to our elementary school"

    "i dont know if thats her"

    "i rly dont think thats her guys"

    AND THE TEACHER CALLED MY NAME AND THEY GO

    "holy shit shes hot"

    THIS

    IS

    THE

    FUCKING

    L I F E

    YOU FUCKING GO IM PROUD OF YOU

    OWN IT FOR ALL OF US

    (Source: toofandomtolivetoohipstertodie)

     
  10. 22:07

    Notes: 238430

    Reblogged from boho-books

    officialbrostrider:

    helenaphan:

    officialbrostrider:

    i remember when i was 14 this kid asked me out and i told him i wasnt allowed to date till i was 16 and he said “i’ll wait.”

    two years later he wished me a happy birthday and asked me out

    did you say yes

    DID YOU FUCKING SAY YES

    image